PMO Programme Management Office

October 17th, 2008   •   no comments   

The Programe Management Office (PMO) for many organisations is the home of project and programe management. Whilst the project support office (PSO) is often seen as an administrative function for a particular project, the PMO is the font of all wisdom about projectand programme management processes used within the organisation.

The PMO is often responsible for:

  • Methodology – Selection, deployment, training & mentoring
  • Project Management Tools and Templates
  • Process Creation and Improvement
  • Metrics and Reporting
  • Integration with Portfolio & Change Management
  • Project Resource Fulfilment (staff, equipment, location)
  • Financial monitoring and reporting
  • Maintaining Central Risk & Issue Registers
  • Project Quality Assurance & Project Audits
  • Project Planning and Updating Service

By having a single enterprise wide project office, repeatable processes can be applied which in turn deliver consistent quality. We will help you develop the project office role within your organisation, which will bring the following benefits:

  • provide effective links with the “portfolio management and assessment” process
  • improved standardisation leading to clarity of work practices
  • improved project monitoring, control and reporting allowing decisions to be made at the right time
  • improved financial reporting and control
  • development of templates for activities such as estimating, risk management and planning which will save time and effort by eliminating repetition

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Portfolio Management

October 17th, 2008   •   no comments   

Portfolio Management refers to way organisations take a corporate view in selecting new projects. They follow a selection process based on the project’s contribution towards the strategic aims of the organisation compared with other potential projects vying for approval. The process is by its nature enterprise wide. It cuts across the organisation horizontally rather than departmentally (vertical).

Portfolio management offers the following benefits:

Enables a corporate perspective to be taken thus preventing local initiatives that may lead to duplication, obsolescence or conflict

  • Provides business driven project selection
  • Informs better investment decision making and resource deployment
  • Enforces best practice and consistency
  • Enables measurement and continuous improvement leading to excellence
  • Keeps staff gainfully employed by identifying peaks and troughs
  • Provides a means by which all departments can have a fair voice and be assessed consistently
  • Ensures that all projects are scoped and initiated according to the standards in place
  • Provides a means to ensure that live projects are monitored and regularly reviewed to determine their progress, relevance and priority 

The following diagram shows how a generic Portfolio Management model may look

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The benefits of portfolio management are brought about by:

  • identifying new requirements as part of the strategic review process
  • quantifying those requirements in terms of likely cost, benefit, impact and alliance with the strategic goalsprioritising the requirements against the portfolio of projects and potential projectsapproving, rejecting or otherwise prioritising the projects
  • formally handing over the requirements to the programme director or equivalent for project initiation thus ensuring top level recognition and approval
  • monitoring the progress of live projects with the authority to cancel and put on hold if circumstances dictate

As will be realised from the above list, the process necessitates involvement by senior management and decision makers. Although many organisations will employ less formal arrangements for carrying out the above, many find that the process leads to conflict and the danger of departmental projects being instigated which may impact other initiates and developments.

Clearly, implementing successful portfolio management is a project in itself and has to be designed to fit within the enterprise project management culture – whichever stage this may be at. Our associates have experience of several different approaches to Portfolio Management and can help to design an approach that best suites your situation.

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Project Governance

October 17th, 2008   •   no comments   

Project Governance …. read more

Capability & Maturity

October 17th, 2008   •   no comments   

Project Management is an accepted management process for delivering major change within an organisation. This is evident from the investment by many organisations in areas such as training, project management methodology (e.g. PRINCE2) and the creation of a Project Office.

Portfolio Management is another development being adopted by many organisations. This refers to the way organisations take a corporate view in selecting and managing projects. This follow a project selection process based on the project’s contribution towards the strategic aims of the organisation compared with other potential projects vying for approval. The process is by its nature enterprise wide since it cuts across the organisation horizontally rather than departmentally (vertical).

Enterprise Project Management therefore refers to the application of enterprise wide project management processes and is an indicator of maturity within the organisation as defined in the Capability and Maturity Models (CMM). As the organisation’s project management culture matures, processes become more and more enterprise related and less departmental. This eliminates duplication and promotes the development of repeatable process and continuous improvement, which leads to consistent quality of output; all of which are further indicators of a mature organisation.

The following diagram shows how a generic EPM model may look.

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 Our Enterprise Project Management services are designed to assist organisations transition towards the enterprise project management culture. We appreciate that there can be no such thing as a “one fits all” approach to project management and with this in mind have developed a flexible model that recognises the advances other sectors have made in enterprise project management modelling including:

  • Office of Government and Commerce’s (OGC) Managing Successful Programmes
  • Software Engineering Institute’s (SEI) Capability Maturity Model (CMM),
  • British Standards Institute’s BSI7069 for project management,
  • Department of Trade and Industry’s (DTI) 10 Key Performance Indicators used for construction
  • The EFQM Excellence Model

 This service is designed to measure the extent to which an organisation is achieving best practice in terms of overall project management. It focuses not on specific projects but on the maturity of the project environment within an organisation. We apply a number of techniques including interviews, self assessment questionnaires, analysis of processes and procedures etc. in order to build a complete and comprehensive picture.

Assessing Project Management Capability & Maturity

We have developed a Project Management Excellence Model (PMEM©) that provides the framework for our analysis and enables us to easily identify quick wins as well as other areas that require longer term improvements. Our model has been in development since 1998 and recognises the advances that other sectors have made in project management modelling including:

 

  • Managing Successful Programmes
  • Software Engineering Institute’s (SEI) Capability Maturity Model (CMM),
  • British Standards Institute’s BSI7069 for project management,
  • Department of Trade and Industry’s (DTI) 10 Key Performance Indicators used for construction
  • The EFQM Excellence Model

 

Following our analysis using the PMEM© model, we will work with the clients to initiate work packages designed to bring specific and calculated improvements. We can also facilitate these improvement on behalf of our clients. The output from this service is a confidential report and/or presentation detailing how the organisation is performing in the key areas of project management. It makes useful comparisons with best practice and with industry norms and recommends a set of actions to bring about controlled improvements.

The key objectives of the exercise would be agreed with the client but would typically be to:

 

  • agree an appropriate target level for the organisation which reflects the organisation’s size, complexity, objectives etc.,
  • perform an assessment, using the Project Management Excellence Model (PMEM) together with an assessment of the capability and maturity of project management within the organisation,
  • compare the organisation with the target level for the organisation and also with best practice and industry norms,
  • demonstrate areas of strength and weakness,
  • propose actions aimed at bringing about measurable improvements,
  • carry out a follow-up exercise at a later date to measure the improvement

 

 

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